A Point to Ponder: Dropping of the atomic bomb: May it never be repeated

Published on Sunday, 6 August 2017 19:48
Written by Phil Mikan

Columnist

On Aug. 6, 1945, at 8:15 a.m., the city of Hiroshima, Japan, was attacked by the United States of America with an atomic bomb. The devastation was epic. Between 60,000 and 80,000 people were killed instantly in the attack, and the destruction of one bomb from one plane set the stage for nuclear war and the arms race, which still goes on today.

The Republic of China celebrated its 90th year of the establishment of communism with a huge parade and military showcase. The Chinese look to be formidable in military equipment and power, and they showed off their stuff. Various fighter planes and modern tanks and self-propelled artillery and lots of new, better and bigger ICBMs (Intercontinental ballistic missiles). It was a great show that the manufacturing center of the world - China - has upgraded its military to one of the best-equipped combat forces in the world.

In Japan, on in the evening of Aug. 6, the people light candles in a Toro Nagashi ceremony (translation: “the Flow of the Lanterns”), more than 80,000 colorful glowing paper lanterns are released into the waters. People tried to find relief on the day of the attack, with the lanterns symbolizing the souls lost on that day.

In the city of Hiroshima, there are memorials to the children, to the 20,000 Koreans, to the American prisoners of war and the tens of thousands who died that day.

he unimaginable death and destruction of this day is brought back to the front of Japan’s and the world’s memory.

On this day the peace bell is rung. The cenotaph at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park reads, “Rest in peace, for the error shall not be repeated.”

Wars are never won. We pray to God this will never be repeated.

A point to ponder.

Phil Mikan is the host of the Phil Mikan Show on WMRD 1150/WLIS AM 1420 daily at 10 a.m. and the Weekend Corner Saturday from 9 to 11 a.m. You can reach him at phil@philmikan.com or write him at Phil Mikan, Central Connecticut Communications, One Herald Square, New Britain, CT 06051



Posted in The Bristol Press, Column on Sunday, 6 August 2017 19:48. Updated: Sunday, 6 August 2017 19:51.